Gavin Seim, Pulls Over Cop Driving In Unmarked Car, Demands ID

Thank you Ed Mazza

Here’s a guy who has a little extra in the guts department.

Gavin Seim, who describes himself as a constitutional activist, recently filmed himself flagging over a police officer who was driving an unmarked car in Grant County, Wash.

The cop seems partly amused, partly in disbelief as Seim asks him for identification.

“This is my ID right here,” the officer says, pointing to the police patch on his uniform.

“That’s not ID, sir,” Seim counters. “If I showed you a badge if you stopped me, would you take that as ID? C’mon. Let’s be reasonable. Anybody can have a patch, sir.”

The officer then shows two forms of ID.

Seim asks if he’s been stopping people in the unmarked vehicle. When the officer admits he has, Seim explains that it’s against state law to do so.

“I’m not going to write you up today,” Seim says. “What I am going to encourage you to do is take this car back.”

When the officer starts to smile, Seim holds firm: “I could call a sheriff out here and demand that you be written up for this because you are in open violation of Washington State RCWs.”

The exchange remains polite throughout, and ends with one final table-turner as Seim sends the cop off with a “you be safe out there” in the edited clip. (Seim has also posted the unedited exchange here.)

Here’s the law Seim is referring to:

“It is unlawful for any public officer having charge of any vehicle owned or controlled by any county, city, town, or public body in this state other than the state of Washington and used in public business to operate the same upon the public highways of this state unless and until there shall be displayed upon such automobile or other motor vehicle in letters of contrasting color not less than one and one-quarter inches in height in a conspicuous place on the right and left sides thereof, the name of such county, city, town, or other public body, together with the name of the department or office upon the business of which the said vehicle is used.”

The law makes an exception for “vehicles of a sheriff’s office, local police department, or any vehicles used by local peace officers under public authority for special undercover or confidential investigative purposes”

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